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Updates! New arrivals, a conference, and a pre-print and a paper

First posted Sep 30, 2019

New Arrivals: Big welcome this Fall to postdoc Phil Grayson, PhD student Eleana Karachaliou, and Meg Mahoney who will all work on sea lamprey genomics. PhD student Claudio Muller has also started and will join team marine mammal. Miranda has stayed on for a second co-op term working on salmon, and for some more species level variation, Leah has transitioned from RA to her red panda honours project.

Conference: This summer Chloe, Riikka, Paul, and I traveled to Fredericton for the Canadian Society of Ecology and Evolution meeting, I presented some perspectives on long-term research from an early career scientist in the Long Term Research section's symposium. Riikka presented her synthetic work on the types of bird species that colonize cities and Chloe presented her own synthetic work exploring the common causes of genetic and species level biodiversity. Finally, Paul presented work on reinforcement in flying squirrels. It was also great to catch up with Kirsten who is now at Trent doing cool stuff with caribou genomes. I missed the last two meetings and this one reminded me why its my favourite meeting.



Paper and a pre-print: I've been lax updating papers here, but I'm going to try to get better. Chloe led work on really neat synthesis of publicly archive data sets showing consistently negative affects of urbanization on mammals. This was recently posted and is our first adventure into pre-prints... so far pre-prints seem to be the best way to get our work out quickly and broadly.


Paper and a pre-print: I've been lax updating papers here, but I'm going to try to get better. Chloe led work on really neat synthesis of publicly archive data sets showing consistently negative affects of urbanization on mammals. This was recently posted and is our first adventure into pre-prints... so far pre-prints seem to be the best way to get our work out quickly and broadly.


I was also a co-author on a collaborative paper led by Kevin Fraser exploring how consistent the timing of migration is within individuals across years. This was based on repeat migratory tracks from 33 purple martins. The timing of migration was pretty variable, potentially a good thing given climate change.





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